British Virgin Islands

Saturday, Apr 17, 2021

Public asked to report side effects of COVID-19 vaccine

Public asked to report side effects of COVID-19 vaccine

As the Virgin Islands continues its COVID-19 vaccination drive, persons who received their first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca Vaccine are asked to report any side effects to the Ministry of Health and Social Development.

Some 3185 persons were vaccinated as of February 25, 2021, according to information coming out of the Government Information Service.

Persons who have experienced side effects can call 468-9850 or email: covid19vaccine@gov.vg to give their information.

Reporting adverse reactions


Acting Chief Medical Officer Dr Ronald E. Georges recently said any adverse reactions to the vaccine in the VI would be reported to the World Health Organisation (WHO), Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) and Pan American Health Organisation (PAHO), as well as the vaccine manufacturer.

Some 3185 persons have been vaccinated for COVID-19 in the Virgin Islands (VI) as of February 25, 2021, according to information coming out of the Government Information Service.


Possible side effects


According to the Medicines & Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) in the UK, most side effects of the AstraZeneca vaccine "resolved within a few days, with some still present a week after vaccination".

The common side effects of this vaccine are: tenderness, pain, warmth, redness, itching, swelling or bruising where the injection is given; Generally feeling unwell; Feeling tired (fatigue); Chills or feeling feverish; Headache; Feeling sick (nausea); Joint pain or muscle ache.

It said other common side effects - affecting up to one in 10 people – include a lump at the injection site, fever; being sick (vomiting) and flu-like symptoms, such as high temperature, sore throat, runny nose, cough and chills.

Acting Chief Medical Officer Dr Ronald E. Georges said any adverse reactions to the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine will be reported to the World Health Organisation (WHO), Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) and Pan American Health Organisation (PAHO), as well as the vaccine manufacturer.


UK to cover costs for treatment of side effects


Further, residents were told should they develop any side effects and have to be treated, the medical costs would be absorbed by the United Kingdom (UK).

Dr Georges had made the disclosure on JTV’s Big Story on February 2, 2021.

“We are looking for the potential for risks and they, the UK, will be covering the costs for it because these are some of the conditions under which the vaccine is procured and it is also being distributed. So that indemnification that the UK gives to their own citizens in the UK is extended to the British Virgin Islands,” Dr Georges had said.

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